Statement of His Holiness the Dalai Lama on the Tibetan National Uprising Day

10 March 2011

Statement of His Holiness the Dalai Lama on the 52nd anniversary of the Tibetan National Uprising Day

Today marks the 52nd anniversary of the Tibetan people’s peaceful uprising of 1959 against Communist China’s repression in the Tibetan capital Lhasa, and the third anniversary of the non-violent demonstrations that took place across Tibet in 2008. On this occasion, I would like to pay tribute to and pray for those brave men and women who sacrificed their lives for the just cause of Tibet. I express my solidarity with those who continue to suffer repression and pray for the well-being of all sentient beings.

For more than sixty years, Tibetans, despite being deprived of freedom and living in fear and insecurity, have been able to maintain their unique Tibetan identity and cultural values. More consequentially, successive new generations, who have no experience of free Tibet, have courageously taken responsibility in advancing the cause of Tibet. This is admirable, for they exemplify the strength of Tibetan resilience.

This Earth belongs to humanity and the People’s Republic of China (PRC) belongs to its 1.3 billion citizens, who have the right to know the truth about the state of affairs in their country and the world at large. If citizens are fully informed, they have the ability to distinguish right from wrong. Censorship and the restriction of information violate basic human decency. For instance, China’s leaders consider the communist ideology and its policies to be correct. If this were so, these policies should be made public with confidence and open to scrutiny.

China, with the world’s largest population, is an emerging world power and I admire the economic development it has made. It also has huge potential to contribute to human progress and world peace. But to do that, China must earn the international community’s respect and trust. In order to earn such respect China’s leaders must develop greater transparency, their actions corresponding to their words. To ensure this, freedom of expression and freedom of the press are essential. Similarly, transparency in governance can help check corruption. In recent years, China has seen an increasing number of intellectuals calling for political reform and greater openness. Premier Wen Jiabao has also expressed support for these concerns. These are significant indications and I welcome them.

The PRC is a country comprising many nationalities, enriched by a diversity of languages and cultures. Protection of the language and culture of each nationality is a policy of the PRC, which is clearly spelt out in its constitution. Tibetan is the only language to preserve the entire range of the Buddha’s teachings, including the texts on logic and theories of knowledge (epistemology), which we inherited from India’s Nalanda University. This is a system of knowledge governed by reason and logic that has the potential to contribute to the peace and happiness of all beings. Therefore, the policy of undermining such a culture, instead of protecting and developing it, will in the long term amount to the destruction of humanity’s common heritage.

The Chinese government frequently states that stability and development in Tibet is the foundation for the long-term well-being. However, the authorities still station large numbers of troops all across Tibet, increasing restrictions on the Tibetan people. Tibetans live in constant fear and anxiety. More recently, many Tibetan intellectuals, public figures and environmentalists have been punished for articulating the Tibetan people’s basic aspiration. They have been imprisoned allegedly for “subverting state power” when actually they have been giving voice to the Tibetan identity and cultural heritage. Such repressive measures undermine unity and stability. Likewise, in China, lawyers defending people’s rights, independent writers and human rights activists have been arrested. I strongly urge the Chinese leaders to review these developments and release these prisoners of conscience forthwith.

The Chinese government claims there is no problem in Tibet other than the personal privileges and status of the Dalai Lama. The reality is that the ongoing oppression of the Tibetan people has provoked widespread, deep resentment against current official policies. People from all walks of life frequently express their discontentment. That there is a problem in Tibet is reflected in the Chinese authorities’ failure to trust Tibetans or win their loyalty. Instead, the Tibetan people live under constant suspicion and surveillance. Chinese and foreign visitors to Tibet corroborate this grim reality.

Therefore, just as we were able to send fact-finding delegations to Tibet in the late 1970s and early 1980s from among Tibetans in exile, we propose similar visits again. At the same time we would encourage the sending of representatives of independent international bodies, including parliamentarians. If they were to find that Tibetans in Tibet are happy, we would readily accept it.

The spirit of realism that prevailed under Mao’s leadership in the early 1950s led China to sign the 17-point agreement with Tibet. A similar spirit of realism prevailed once more during Hu Yaobang’s time in the early 1980s. If there had been a continuation of such realism the Tibetan issue, as well as several other problems, could easily have been solved. Unfortunately, conservative views derailed these policies. The result is that after more than six decades, the problem has become more intractable.

The Tibetan Plateau is the source of the major rivers of Asia. Because it has the larges concentration of glaciers apart from the two Poles, it is considered to be the Third Pole. Environmental degradation in Tibet will have a detrimental impact on large parts of Asia, particularly on China and the Indian subcontinent. Both the central and local governments, as well as the Chinese public, should realise the degradation of the Tibetan environment and develop sustainable measures to safeguard it. I appeal to China to take into account the survival of people affected by what happens environmentally on the Tibetan Plateau.

In our efforts to solve the issue of Tibet, we have consistently pursued the mutually beneficial Middle-Way Approach, which seeks genuine autonomy for the Tibetan people within the PRC. In our talks with officials of the Chinese government’s United Front Work Department we have clearly explained in detail the Tibetan people’s hopes and aspirations. The lack of any positive response to our reasonable proposals makes us wonder whether these were fully and accurately conveyed to the higher authorities.

Since ancient times, Tibetan and Chinese peoples have lived as neighbours. It would be a mistake if our unresolved differences were to affect this age-old friendship. Special efforts are being made to promote good relations between Tibetans and Chinese living abroad and I am happy that this has contributed to better understanding and friendship between us. Tibetans inside Tibet should also cultivate good relations with our Chinese brothers and sisters.

In recent weeks we have witnessed remarkable non-violent struggles for freedom and democracy in various parts of North Africa and elsewhere. I am a firm believer in non-violence and people power and these events have shown once again that determined non-violent action can indeed bring about positive change. We must all hope that these inspiring changes lead to genuine freedom, happiness and prosperity for the peoples in these countries.

One of the aspirations I have cherished since childhood is the reform of Tibet’s political and social structure, and in the few years when I held effective power in Tibet, I managed to make some fundamental changes. Although I was unable to take this further in Tibet, I have made every effort to do so since we came into exile. Today, within the framework of the Charter of Tibetans in Exile, the Kalon Tripa, the political leadership, and the people’s representatives are directly elected by the people. We have been able to implement democracy in exile that is in keeping with the standards of an open society.

As early as the 1960s, I have repeatedly stressed that Tibetans need a leader, elected freely by the Tibetan people, to whom I can devolve power. Now, we have clearly reached the time to put this into effect. During the forthcoming eleventh session of the fourteenth Tibetan Parliament in Exile, which begins on 14th March, I will formally propose that the necessary amendments be made to the Charter for Tibetans in Exile, reflecting my decision to devolve my formal authority to the elected leader.

Since I made my intention clear I have received repeated and earnest requests both from within Tibet and outside, to continue to provide political leadership. My desire to devolve authority has nothing to do with a wish to shirk responsibility. It is to benefit Tibetans in the long run. It is not because I feel disheartened. Tibetans have placed such faith and trust in me that as one among them I am committed to playing my part in the just cause of Tibet. I trust that gradually people will come to understand my intention, will support my decision and accordingly let it take effect.

I would like to take this opportunity to remember the kindness of the leaders of various nations that cherish justice, members of parliaments, intellectuals and Tibet Support Groups who have been steadfast in their support for the Tibetan people. In particular, we will always remember the kindness and consistent support of the people and Government of India and State Governments for generously helping Tibetans preserve and promote their religion and culture and ensuring the welfare of Tibetans in exile. To all of them I offer my heartfelt gratitude.

With my prayers for the welfare and happiness of all sentient beings.
Dali Lama
10 March 2011
Dharamsala, India

Uttalelse fra Hans Hellighet Dalai Lama

10 March 2011 Statement of His Holiness the Dalai Lama on the 52nd anniversary of the Tibetan National Uprising Day Today marks the 52nd anniversary of the Tibetan people’s peaceful uprising of 1959 against Communist China’s repression in the Tibetan capital Lhasa, and the third anniversary of the non-violent demonstrations that took place across Tibet in 2008. On this occasion, I would like to pay tribute to and pray for those brave men and women who sacrificed their lives for the just cause of Tibet. I express my solidarity with those who continue to suffer repression and pray for the well-being of all sentient beings. For more than sixty years, Tibetans, despite being deprived of freedom and living in fear and insecurity, have been able to maintain their unique Tibetan identity and cultural values. More consequentially, successive new generations, who have no experience of free Tibet, have courageously taken responsibility in advancing the cause of Tibet. This is admirable, for they exemplify the strength of Tibetan resilience. This Earth belongs to humanity and the People’s Republic of China (PRC) belongs to its 1.3 billion citizens, who have the right to know the truth about the state of affairs in their country and the world at large. If citizens are fully informed, they have the ability to distinguish right from wrong. Censorship and the restriction of information violate basic human decency. For instance, China’s leaders consider the communist ideology and its policies to be correct. If this were so, these policies should be made public with confidence and open to scrutiny. China, with the world’s largest population, is an emerging world power and I admire the economic development it has made. It also has huge potential to contribute to human progress and world peace. But to do that, China must earn the international community’s respect and trust. In order to earn such respect China’s leaders must develop greater transparency, their actions corresponding to their words. To ensure this, freedom of expression and freedom of the press are essential. Similarly, transparency in governance can help check corruption. In recent years, China has seen an increasing number of intellectuals calling for political reform and greater openness. Premier Wen Jiabao has also expressed support for these concerns. These are significant indications and I welcome them. The PRC is a country comprising many nationalities, enriched by a diversity of languages and cultures. Protection of the language and culture of each nationality is a policy of the PRC, which is clearly spelt out in its constitution. Tibetan is the only language to preserve the entire range of the Buddha’s teachings, including the texts on logic and theories of knowledge (epistemology), which we inherited from India’s Nalanda University. This is a system of knowledge governed by reason and logic that has the potential to contribute to the peace and happiness of all beings. Therefore, the policy of undermining such a culture, instead of protecting and developing it, will in the long term amount to the destruction of humanity’s common heritage. The Chinese government frequently states that stability and development in Tibet is the foundation for the long-term well-being. However, the authorities still station large numbers of troops all across Tibet, increasing restrictions on the Tibetan people. Tibetans live in constant fear and anxiety. More recently, many Tibetan intellectuals, public figures and environmentalists have been punished for articulating the Tibetan people’s basic aspiration. They have been imprisoned allegedly for “subverting state power” when actually they have been giving voice to the Tibetan identity and cultural heritage. Such repressive measures undermine unity and stability. Likewise, in China, lawyers defending people’s rights, independent writers and human rights activists have been arrested. I strongly urge the Chinese leaders to review these developments and release these prisoners of conscience forthwith. The Chinese government claims there is no problem in Tibet other than the personal privileges and status of the Dalai Lama. The reality is that the ongoing oppression of the Tibetan people has provoked widespread, deep resentment against current official policies. People from all walks of life frequently express their discontentment. That there is a problem in Tibet is reflected in the Chinese authorities’ failure to trust Tibetans or win their loyalty. Instead, the Tibetan people live under constant suspicion and surveillance. Chinese and foreign visitors to Tibet corroborate this grim reality. Therefore, just as we were able to send fact-finding delegations to Tibet in the late 1970s and early 1980s from among Tibetans in exile, we propose similar visits again. At the same time we would encourage the sending of representatives of independent international bodies, including parliamentarians. If they were to find that Tibetans in Tibet are happy, we would readily accept it. The spirit of realism that prevailed under Mao’s leadership in the early 1950s led China to sign the 17-point agreement with Tibet. A similar spirit of realism prevailed once more during Hu Yaobang’s time in the early 1980s. If there had been a continuation of such realism the Tibetan issue, as well as several other problems, could easily have been solved. Unfortunately, conservative views derailed these policies. The result is that after more than six decades, the problem has become more intractable. The Tibetan Plateau is the source of the major rivers of Asia. Because it has the larges concentration of glaciers apart from the two Poles, it is considered to be the Third Pole. Environmental degradation in Tibet will have a detrimental impact on large parts of Asia, particularly on China and the Indian subcontinent. Both the central and local governments, as well as the Chinese public, should realise the degradation of the Tibetan environment and develop sustainable measures to safeguard it. I appeal to China to take into account the survival of people affected by what happens environmentally on the Tibetan Plateau. In our efforts to solve the issue of Tibet, we have consistently pursued the mutually beneficial Middle-Way Approach, which seeks genuine autonomy for the Tibetan people within the PRC. In our talks with officials of the Chinese government’s United Front Work Department we have clearly explained in detail the Tibetan

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people’s hopes and aspirations. The lack of any positive response to our reasonable proposals makes us wonder whether these were fully and accurately conveyed to the higher authorities. Since ancient times, Tibetan and Chinese peoples have lived as neighbours. It would be a mistake if our unresolved differences were to affect this age-old friendship. Special efforts are being made to promote good relations between Tibetans and Chinese living abroad and I am happy that this has contributed to better understanding and friendship between us. Tibetans inside Tibet should also cultivate good relations with our Chinese brothers and sisters. In recent weeks we have witnessed remarkable non-violent struggles for freedom and democracy in various parts of North Africa and elsewhere. I am a firm believer in non-violence and people power and these events have shown once again that determined non-violent action can indeed bring about positive change. We must all hope that these inspiring changes lead to genuine freedom, happiness and prosperity for the peoples in these countries. One of the aspirations I have cherished since childhood is the reform of Tibet’s political and social structure, and in the few years when I held effective power in Tibet, I managed to make some fundamental changes. Although I was unable to take this further in Tibet, I have made every effort to do so since we came into exile. Today, within the framework of the Charter of Tibetans in Exile, the Kalon Tripa, the political leadership, and the people’s representatives are directly elected by the people. We have been able to implement democracy in exile that is in keeping with the standards of an open society. As early as the 1960s, I have repeatedly stressed that Tibetans need a leader, elected freely by the Tibetan people, to whom I can devolve power. Now, we have clearly reached the time to put this into effect. During the forthcoming eleventh session of the fourteenth Tibetan Parliament in Exile, which begins on 14th March, I will formally propose that the necessary amendments be made to the Charter for Tibetans in Exile, reflecting my decision to devolve my formal authority to the elected leader. Since I made my intention clear I have received repeated and earnest requests both from within Tibet and outside, to continue to provide political leadership. My desire to devolve authority has nothing to do with a wish to shirk responsibility. It is to benefit Tibetans in the long run. It is not because I feel disheartened. Tibetans have placed such faith and trust in me that as one among them I am committed to playing my part in the just cause of Tibet. I trust that gradually people will come to understand my intention, will support my decision and accordingly let it take effect. I would like to take this opportunity to remember the kindness of the leaders of various nations that cherish justice, members of parliaments, intellectuals and Tibet Support Groups who have been steadfast in their support for the Tibetan people. In particular, we will always remember the kindness and consistent support of the people and Government of India and State Governments for generously helping Tibetans preserve and promote their religion and culture and ensuring the welfare of Tibetans in exile. To all of them I offer my heartfelt gratitude. With my prayers for the welfare and happiness of all sentient beings. Dali Lama 10 March 2011 Dharamsala, India

Kina innfører reiseforbud til Tibet i forkant av 52-årsmarkeringen av den store folkeoppstanden i Lhasa

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10.03.2011 Kina innfører reiseforbud til Tibet i forkant av 52-årsmarkeringen av Tibets opprørsdag: 10 mars 1959. 10. mars i år er det 52 år siden den store folkeoppstanden i Tibets hovedstad Lhasa som var rettet mot den kinesiske okkupasjonsmakten. På denne dagen, 10. mars – er symboldagen for tibetanernes motstand mot kinesisk styre i Tibet. Vi ønsker å utfordre kinesiske myndigheter til dialog og engasjement for å få en løsning på Tibet- konflikten. Lovnadene om for økt presse- og ytringsfrihet ifm. OL har vist seg å være tomme

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ord. Jasminrevolusjonen i den arabiske verdenen har spredd seg til Kina, men oppblomstringen av demonstrasjonene har blitt slått ned av de kinesiske myndighetene med arrestasjoner, overvåkning, innskrenkelse av pressefrihet og ytringsfrihet. Den norske Tibet-komité (DnT) og Det Tibetanske Samfunnet i Norge vil holde en markering utenfor Folkerepublikken Kinas ambassade den 10. mars kl 16.00. Daglig leder av DnT, Chungdak Koren sier at: “Vi er klar til å utveksle synspunkter om Tibet-konflikten og samtale om realitetene, og ikke minst veien frem mot en løsning på dilemmaet, sammen med representanter fra den kinesiske ambassaden. Vi håper at Kinas representanter nå vil ta imot utfordringen på en konstruktiv måte”. Siden 2008 har situasjonen i Tibet blitt forverret. Styreleder for DnT, Olav Gunnar Ballo sier klart at: “Kinas brutale undertrykkelse av det tibetanske folk er blitt ytterligere intensivert. En sentral global aktør som Kina bør ikke se seg tjent med å misbruke sin makt i Tibet slik tilfellet har vært til nå”. Kinesiske myndigheter tillater ikke utlendinger å besøke Tibet i mars og april i år, grunnet frykt for nye demonstrasjoner og markeringerer. Program for 10. mars 2011 Kl 16.00. Markering foran Kinas ambassade kl. 17.15. Markering foran Stortinget Kl 18.30 . Menneskerettighets huset. 5 etg (Kirkegata 5. 0153 Oslo) Fotograf Erik Torjusen viser sin bildeutstilling fra Tibet, og forteller om sine reiser til Tibet. Torjussen var første gang i Tibet i mars 1989, og har senere reist rundt store deler av landet, også områder som vanligvis ikke er tilgjengelig for utlendinger. Hans siste opphold var i 2009, tjue år etter hans første besøk. Torjussen vil fortelle om sine sterke opplevelser, inkludert den himmelske begravelsen, som er en helt spesiell tibetansk tradisjon. Det vil bli anledning til å se bildene fra Torjussens galleriutstilling i Menneskerettighetshuset

Markering i Oslo av 10. mars

Markering i Oslo av 10.mars – tibetanernes opprørsdag 10. mars i år er det 52 år siden den store folkeoppstanden i Tibets hovedstad Lhasa rettet mot den kinesiske okkupasjonsmakten. Markering i Oslo av 10. mars 1959 Program for torsdag 10. mars 2011: Markering foran Kinas ambassade kl. 16.00 Markering foran Stortinget kl. 17.15-18.00 Appeller ved Den norske Tibet-komité Arrangement i Menneskerettighetshuset kl 18.30 Fotograf Erik

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Torjusen viser sin bildeutstilling fra Tibet, og forteller om sine reiser til Tibet. Torjussen var første gang i Tibet i mars 1989, og har senere reist rundt til store deler av landet, også områder som vanligvis ikke nås av utlendinger. Hans siste opphold var i 2009, tjue år etter hans første besøk. Torjussen vil fortelle om sine sterke opplevelser, inkludert den himmelske begravelsen, som er en helt spesiell tibetansk tradisjon. Det vil bli anledning til å se bildene fra Torjussens galleriutstilling i Menneskerettighetshuset. Vi håper at flest mulig vil delta, også de som ikke har anledning til å ta del i markeringen tidligere på dagen. Adresse: Menneskerettighetshuset, 5 etg, Kirkegata 5, 0153 Oslo Les også om markering i Tromsø

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ved utstilling.

Invitasjon til utstilling av Erik Torjusens bilder fra Tibet

I 2009 lot den norske forfatter og fotograf Erik Torjusen seg smugle inn i Tibet. Ut av denne reisen er det nylig blitt publisert en reisebok kalt “Tilbake til Tibet”. Nå skal Torjusen i tillegg dele sine visuelle minner i form av en bildeutstilling. Dette skjer i Oslo hvor Galleri Cornucopia i perioden 17. februar til 4. mars vil stille ut 22 av Torjusens bilder. I forbindelse med invitasjon til utstillingsåpning har kinesiske myndigheter forsøkt å hindre Torjusen i å publisere bokomtalen. Vi bringer den derfor i sin helhet her:

”Reiseskildringer fra Tibet er en mangelvare. Århundrer med isolasjon har gjort at denne mytiske fjellregionen nærmest har vært umulig å utforske. Fremdeles er det vanskelig. Kina, som annekterte Tibet i 1950, utøver beinhard kontroll, og det er strengt forbudt å reise her uten å være del av en myndighetskontrollert turistgruppe. I 1989 havnet Erik Torjusen i kryssilden mellom steinkastende tibetanere og tungt bevæpnet kinesisk politi. Militær unntakstilstand ble erklært, og forfatteren ble tvangsevakuert ut av Tibet. Til fots bar det over Himalaya-fjellene og ned til Nepal. Tjue år senere er han tilbake, smuglet inn på en buss mot Lhasa. I fem måneder

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oppholder forfatteren seg blant tibetanerne. Målet er å lære noe om det som skjuler seg bak det glorete glansbildet kineserne så demonstrativt viser Tibet-turister. Boken er som reisen; et usensurert og fritt møte med et fascinerende, lite folk som nekter å gjøre knefall for en monstrøs og egenrådig overmakt.”

Hjertelig velkommen til åpningen av utstillingen!

Tibetansk dokumentar vises på Tromsø filmfestival

Oslo, 17. januar 2011 A Tibetan documentary film, “The Sun Behind the Clouds: Tibet’s Struggle for Freedom“, by Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam has been selected for the 21st Tromsø International Film Festival (TIFF), to be held from January 18-23, and is also nominated for its Norwegian Film Peace Award. TIFF is the biggest film festival held in Northern Norway. It is a

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popular film festival, and at the same time an important meeting place for the Norwegian and international film industries. Tromsø is the largest Norwegian town north of the Arctic Circle, the gateway to the Arctic and boasts the world’s northernmost university. The city enjoys midnight sun from May 18 to July 26. TIFF 2011 will be the 21st edition of the event. The festival screens challenging and quality films

for local, national and international audiences. Mr Tord Eriksen from the Tromsø chapter of the Norwegian Tibet Committee said, “The directors of the film, Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam, have been invited for the festival. The Norwegian Tibet Committee will use this opportunity to highlight the issue of Tibet during the festival. Ms Chungdak Koren from our main office will be coming to Tromsø to help facilitate this.” Contact: Chungdak Koren Tel: +47 95024443 Tord Eriksen Tel: +47 95704786

A Tibetan documentary film featured at Tromsø International Film Festival

Oslo, January 17

A Tibetan documentary film, “The Sun Behind the Clouds: Tibet’s Struggle for Freedom“, by Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam has been selected for the 21st Tromsø International Film Festival (TIFF), to be held from January 18-23, and is also nominated for its Norwegian Film Peace Award.

TIFF is the biggest film festival held in Northern Norway. It is a popular film festival, and at the same time an important meeting place for the Norwegian and international film industries. Tromsø is the largest Norwegian town north of the Arctic Circle, the gateway to the Arctic and boasts the world’s northernmost university. The city enjoys midnight sun from May 18 to July 26.

TIFF 2011 will be the 21st edition of the event. The festival screens challenging and quality films for local, national and international audiences.

Mr Tord Eriksen from the Tromsø chapter of the Norwegian Tibet Committee said, “The directors of the film, Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam, have been invited for the festival. The Norwegian Tibet Committee will use this opportunity to highlight the issue of Tibet during the festival. Ms Chungdak Koren from our main office will be coming to Tromsø to help facilitate this.”

Contact:
Chungdak Koren
Tel: +47 95024443
Tord Eriksen
Tel: +47 95704786

Videokonferanse mellom Dalai Lama og menneskerettighetaktivister i Kina

Dalai Lama snakker med

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kinesiske menneskerettighetaktivister i Kina, blant annet Teng Biao, og menneskerettigheteradvokat Jiang Tianyong, gjennom videokonferanse. Denne konferanse ble arrangert av den kjente kinesiske forfatteren Wang Lixong den 4. januar 2011. Transcript of Video-Conference with His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Chinese Activists

Den norske Tibet-komite ber Kina løslate Liu Xiaobo

TIBETANS AND SUPPORTERS STAND IN SOLIDARITY WITH LIU XIAOBO AND ALL PRISONERS OF CONSCIENCE DETAINED BY CHINA Oslo, Norway, 8 December 2010 On 10 december Tibetans and supporters around the world will take part in celebrations with Chinese human rights defenders to express their support for Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo. “This honour for Liu Xiaobo is an honour for all prisoners of conscience, including hundreds of Tibetans, persecuted by China for exercising freedom of speech,” said Chungdak Koren Director of the Norwegian Tibet Committee, part of the International Tibet Network. “We join Tibet Groups around the world in saluting Liu Xiaobo’s courage and integrity, and stand today with the people of China to celebrate this tribute to a man who has worked tirelessly for their right to freedom of expression.” The voices calling for reform in China are getting louder and stronger with more and more Chinese and Tibetan advocates risking their lives to promote the freedom they desire. Thousands of prisoners – Chines as well as Tibetans – continue to be held behind bars, serving long sentences for speaking out and voicing their opinions . Before Liu was sentenced in 2009 he said in his ‘Final Statement’, “Freedom of expression is the basis of human rights, the source of humanity and the mother of truth. To block freedom of speech is to trample on human rights, to strangle humanity and to suppress the truth.” “By awarding this prize to Liu Xiaobo, the Nobel Committee has illuminated the human and political rights of the people in China and Tibet and created a sense of hope,” said Wenche Thingnes Vice Chairwomen of the Norwegain Tibet Committee . “We now expect governments around the world to follow the Committee’s moral leadership, to press China’s leaders to release Liu Xiaobo and all the heroic Chinese and Tibetan

human rights defenders that remain in prison, and urge them to take meaningful steps to implement the political and human rights reforms that these brave advocates are risking their lives to promote.” Norwegian Tibet Committee appreciate the symbolism and poignancy of the empty chair at the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony on 10 December, since neither Liu XIaobo nor any close family members are able to collect the award. We look forward to the day when Liu, and thousands of others currently detained by China, can take their chairs and freely express their views to the world without reprisal. Press Realse 8 December 2010 Contact: Chungdak Koren Mobl: +47 95024443

Release of fellow Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi

MESSAGE from H.H. The Dalai Lama
November 14th 2010

I welcome the release of fellow Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and extend my appreciation to the military regime in Burma. I extend my full support and solidarity to the movement for democracy in Burma and take this opportunity to appeal to freedom-loving people all over the world to support such non-violent movements.

I pray and hope that the government of the People’s Republic of China will release fellow Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo and other prisoners of conscience who have been imprisoned for exercising their freedom of expression.

Nobel fredsprisvinner Aung San Suu Kyi løslatt

MESSAGE from H.H. The Dalai Lama November 14th 2010

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fellow Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo and other prisoners of conscience who have been imprisoned for exercising their freedom of expression.

Tibetan students protest exclusively use of Chinese in the classes

BEIJING – Tibetan students in western China marched in protest of unconfirmed plans to use the Chinese language exclusively in classes, teachers said Wednesday, an unusually bold challenge to authorities that reflects a deep unease over cultural marginalization.
Students marched from school to school in the town of Tongren in Qinghai province on Tuesday chanting slogans against unconfirmed plans to supplant the use of Tibetan, the teachers said.
The march ended by midday and classes resumed in the afternoon, said a teacher at the Huangnan Prefecture No. 1 Minorities High School in Tongren.
The teacher, who refused to give his name out of fear of retaliation by authorities, said about 300 students from the school had participated in the march. The London-based group Free Tibet and U.S. broadcaster Radio Free Asia said students from six different schools joined in the march with estimates of the total number of participants ranging from 1,000 to 7,000.
Fuzzy video of the march posted to the Internet showed students, many of them in school uniform, marching alongside Tibetan monks.
A teacher at the Huangnan Prefecture No. 2 Minorities High School said classes had resumed on Wednesday. The teacher, who identified himself only by his surname, Xu, said about 90 students took part.
The teachers said police did not intervene in the march and school administrators did not plan to punish participants.
“The students marched peacefully. Their only demand was for continued use of their mother tongue,” said the No. 1 High School teacher.
The schools use Mandarin and Tibetan alongside each other and both teachers said they had seen no official orders to switch entirely to Chinese. However, they said rumors and unconfirmed reports of a planned change in policy had been spreading among students and faculty and no clarification had been offered by education authorities.
Calls to the prefectural government, its education bureau, and the government spokesman’s office all rang unanswered on Wednesday.
Traditionally Tibetan areas such as Tongren that lie outside the official Tibetan Autonomous Region were sealed off following widespread anti-government rioting in the spring of 2008. Scores were arrested and a crackdown waged against Buddhist monasteries and other repositories of Tibetan tradition.
They remain among China’s most restive regions and a notice posted on the No. 1 High School’s website contained an unusually detailed reminder of faculty responsibility for maintaining stability on campus, including discouraging the spread of rumors and boosting “identification with the motherland.”
Many Tibetans argue they have traditionally been self-governing and that Chinese policies are wrecking their traditional culture.
China defends those policies, saying they aim to spur economic growth in the largely poor areas and better integrate them with China proper.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/20/AR2010102000451.html

Tibetanske studenter protesterer mot utelukkende bruke av kinesisk i undervisningen

BEIJING — Tibetan students in western China marched in protest of unconfirmed plans to use the Chinese language exclusively in classes, teachers said Wednesday, an unusually bold challenge to authorities that reflects a deep unease over cultural marginalization. Students marched from school to school in the town of Tongren in Qinghai province on Tuesday chanting slogans against unconfirmed plans to supplant the use of Tibetan, the teachers said. The march ended by midday and classes resumed in the afternoon, said a teacher at the Huangnan Prefecture No. 1 Minorities High School in Tongren. The teacher, who refused to give his name out of fear of retaliation by authorities, said about 300 students from the school had participated in the march. The London-based group Free Tibet and U.S. broadcaster Radio Free Asia said students from six different schools joined in the march with estimates of the total number of participants ranging from 1,000 to 7,000. Fuzzy video of the march posted to the Internet showed students, many of them in school uniform, marching alongside Tibetan monks. A teacher at the Huangnan Prefecture No. 2 Minorities High School said classes had resumed on Wednesday. The teacher, who identified himself only by his surname, Xu, said about 90 students took part. The teachers said police did not intervene in the march and school administrators did not plan to punish participants. “The students marched peacefully. Their only demand was for continued use of their mother tongue,” said the No. 1 High School teacher. The schools use Mandarin and Tibetan alongside each other and both teachers said they had seen no official orders to switch

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entirely to Chinese. However, they said rumors and unconfirmed reports of a planned change in policy had been spreading among students and faculty and no clarification had been offered by education authorities. Calls to the prefectural government, its education bureau, and the government spokesman’s office all rang unanswered on Wednesday. Traditionally Tibetan areas such as Tongren that lie outside the official Tibetan Autonomous Region were sealed off following widespread anti-government rioting in the spring of 2008. Scores were arrested and a crackdown waged against Buddhist monasteries and other repositories of Tibetan tradition. They remain among China’s most restive regions and a notice posted on the No. 1 High School’s website contained an unusually detailed reminder of faculty responsibility for maintaining stability on campus, including discouraging the spread of rumors and boosting “identification with the motherland.” Many Tibetans argue they have traditionally been self-governing and that Chinese policies are wrecking their traditional culture. China defends those policies, saying they aim to spur economic growth in the largely poor areas and better integrate them with China proper. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/20/AR2010102000451.html

Tibetanske delegater samlet til første Nasjonale møte

His Holiness the Dalai Lama Addresses Tibetan National General Meeting 26-31 August 2010 31 August 2010 DHARAMSALA

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— His Holiness the Dalai Lama today addressed the delegates of the first National General Meeting, underlining the need for unity and a robust democratic administration in exile to keep alive the hopes and aspirations of Tibetans living inside Tibet. Speaking on the closing day of the 6-day meeting, His Holiness emphasised that unity has to be developed through trust and transparency between the administration and public which in turn will strengthen our efforts. His Holiness expressed his appreciation of the meeting and called for more frequent and interactive meetings between the administration and general public. The meeting also passed a unanimous resolution entreating His Holiness the Dalai Lama not to retire from leading the Tibetan struggle. Responding to the appeal, His Holiness said the democratically elected leadership of Tibetans in exile must be able to take full responsibility in leading the quest of Tibet in his absence. Speaking on the efforts in resolving the issue of Tibet through the Middle-Way Approach, His Holiness said the policy is strongly supported by the international community, including the US government, EU Parliament and government of India. With a strong commitment to a mutually beneficial solution for both China and Tibet, I feel very confident to express our approach when meeting with the Chinese people, he added. Acting Kalon Tripa Tsering Phuntsok conveyed the real aspiration of the Tibetan people appealing His Holiness the Dalai Lama not to abdicate from leading them, and use his wisdom to decide the course of action on Tibet in accordance with the changing political situation in China and the world at large. His Holiness also spoke about the need to make progress in education, to strengthen the preservation of Tibet’s culture and to maintain the moral behaviour of the Tibetan people. The speaker of the Tibetan Parliament-in-Exile, Mr Penpa Tsering read out a 32-page final recommendation to strengthen democracy, sustenance of settlements, finance, education, health, awareness of political affairs and publicity of Tibetan issue. He said the Kashag and the Tibetan Parliament-in-Exile will make utmost efforts to implement the recommendations of the national general meeting even though they are yet to become laws. The Kashag called for cooperation of the Tibetan Parliament, intellectuals, non-governmental organisations and the community in its efforts to implement those recommendations which are feasible. The Kashag said it will make best efforts to strengthen the sustenance of settlements, education, health, finance, advocacy of Tibetan people.

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China Changes Rules on Evidence Obtained by Torture

China Changes Rules on Evidence Obtained by Torture

http://blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/2010/06/15/china-changes-rules-on-evidence-obtained-by-torture/?blog_id=72&post_id=9130

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